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September 19, 2013 10:04AM EST

Q&A with Aaron Sorkin

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  • Q

    Has there ever been a particularly difficult or emotional scene to shoot? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. There are couple of scenes coming up between Will and Mac in the two-part season finale that are the hardest scenes Jeff and Emily have had to do but they both hit it out of the park. In Ep. 205 ("News Night With Will McAvoy"), Olivia had some tough scenes but, like everyone, Olivia shows up to play. Alison of course in "Unintended Consequences". Next week's episode ("Red Team III") puts everyone to work. When an actor has a particularly tough scene they get a lot of support from the people around them--it's great to be a part of.

  • Q

    Which character would you say is the most complex to write ?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    When I'm doing my job well they should all be complicated to write. The Will/Mac dyadic is very tricky. They love each other and respect each other but there's something cemented into Will that won't let him forgive her for a past betrayal. This season Maggie goes through a life altering experience about halfway through the season and I didn't want to minimize it by…well, by writing badly. In the 5th episode I think you're going to see new layers to a number of characters. Thanks for the great question.--Aaron

  • Q

    Which was your favorite episode to write? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I haven't written an episode yet that I wouldn't want to re-write but I think I'm getting better at the show with practice. There's an episode coming up this season (Episode 5, "News Night With Will McAvoy") that I particularly enjoyed writing. It takes place in real time (no time cuts) entirely during a broadcast and the more something feels like a play, the more comfortable I'm going to be. Thanks a lot for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    When writing the election night episode, was the story driving the characters or characters driving the story ?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the great question. I'd say that depending on the story and depending on the characters it's a mix of both. For instance, Will and MacKenzie have a self-induced problem (though it's being brought to a boil by the humiliation of Genoa) and so those characters are driving that story. But Charlie's going to have to decide now whether to air an incumbent congressional candidate's remarks about "women crying rape" or break the Petraeus story two days before everyone else--the story's driving the character. Thanks again for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    When you are writing the show do you write a complete episode at one time or do you go back and forth writing between a few shows? Big Fan!

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. I can only write one thing at a time and when I'm writing an episode that's where my head is 24 hours a day. I may know that I have to set something up for the next episode but my eyes are squarely on what's right in front of me. Thanks again for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    The seasons of The Newsroom are so much shorter than all of your other series, Is it more or less challenging to create seasons this short?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    A broadcast network's season is usually 22 episodes while an HBO season is roughly half that (we did 10 episodes last year and 9 this year.) There's an expression that the shark gets as big as the tank and when it comes to series television I agree. The shorter season seems just as challenging as the longer one because each episode seems like a big mountain to climb and when you're done you're back at the bottom of the mountain again. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Do you prefer writing episodes that include factual news or creating stories inspired by real events? Is one easier than the other? #HBOcollege #UofSC

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Rachael, thanks for the question. The real news on the show is only there to serve the fiction. In last night's episode for example, Charlie, who's humiliated and broken after airing a false story about military misconduct, is handed the chance to break the David Petraeus story (about military misconduct.) Because the show's set in the recent past, the audience frequently knows more than the characters do and I find that dynamic fun sometimes. Thanks again for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Have you ever considered a theatre adaptation of the Newsroom? #HBOcollege #VCU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I haven't. Do you have a good idea for one?--Aaron

  • Q

    This show had a pretty solid message in season 1. What do you expect the audience to take away from Genoa ?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    The truth is, I don't have much control over the take-away. I hope people have a good time for the hour I've asked for their attention. The characters on the show are all different and have personal demons, large and small. But the most important thing to each of them is integrity and the worst thing that can happen to any of them is to have their reputations damaged. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Recently, and in these last two episodes in particular, you seem to have adopted the cliffhanger. Was this a personal or network decision?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    This season is really one story divided into nine chapters and so some episodes lend themselves to a hard out like last night (and the week before.) Sometimes I'll look and see that I wrote a page past where I should have stopped (I call it missing the exit) and I'll find the blackout line buried in the scene. I wouldn't want to do a cliffhanger ending every week but sometimes if I mix it up I can catch you by surprise. Thanks again for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    What has been the biggest challenge with Season 2 so far? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    The biggest challenge has been the same challenge as always--writing well and time. With a movie or a play you have time. If you're stuck, if you've run into a snow bank, if you're just not writing well, you can call the studio or the producer or whoever's waiting for it and say, "I need more time". With series television you have to meet pre-determined air dates and so you have to write even when you're not writing well and then you have to point a camera at it. You don't want to disappoint the cast and crew, you don't want to disappoint the people who've bet money on you and you absolutely don't want to disappoint the audience. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Has there ever been a musical or historical reference you wanted to make but couldn't find the place for? #HBOCollege #Newsroom #UofSC

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Off the top of my head I can't think of one, but I also can't think of a time when there was a reference that I wanted to make and then found a way to make it. It happens the other way--where Don Quixote becomes a metaphor or Will wants to keep punishing an intern, etc. I got my degree in musical theater so I have to use to my parents' tuition money somehow. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Do you consider something like Genoa far more ethically wrong as compared to some other issues like privacy invasion by the Govt. ?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    For me, what Dantana does with the general's interview is just straight up wrong but he'd tell you it was right. He'd tell you that he believes the story's true, that a terrible, criminal, murderous thing is happening and could continue to happen, that Stomtonovich confirmed it off camera and that he got cold feet once Dantana was rolling and that he's a hero. You get to decide if it's one of those things or something in between. As for the Government snooping? I think it's a big issue and I'm glad smarter and better informed people than I am are talking about it but on a gut level I'm less concerned about invasion of privacy than I am with the commoditization of invasion of privacy. Thanks a lot for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    Do any scenes in the Newsroom come from your real life experiences? #HBOcollege #UCBerkeley

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I really don't write autobiographically--if I did, I think I'd be unemployed. Every once in a while I'm able to use something from my life as a jumping off point. (I wrote the movie Charlie Wilson's War and we shot for about three weeks in Morocco and I had a funny experience getting the shots and pills that were required for the trip and I used a fictionalized version of that for Maggie when I needed to keep the Africa story alive while moving other stories forward. That kind of thing.) Thanks for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    If you could play one character on the show, who would it be? #HBOcollege #UCBerkeley

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I get to play all the characters while I'm writing the show. I'm very active when I write--getting up from my desk and walking around or talking out loud in my car. I'm an excellent Leona. Thanks for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Do you write based around the actor? Or do you find actors that can fulfill the demands of your characters? #HBOcollege #VCU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. At the outset you're writing before any actors have been cast so there's an adjustment period but now I can write knowing (with the exception of guest casting) exactly who's playing it and I can do my best to give them good pitches to hit. Luckily for me this cast can hit just about everything. Thanks again for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Was there a conscious effort this season to focus on the character professional missteps (Maggie's editing of the zimmerman call, the TAILWIND-esque GENOA)? Since you write in the past it is possible they could be right all the time after all.

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Jake, Thanks for the question. Setting the show in the recent past was never meant to be used as a tool to leverage hindsight into easy wins for the characters. You want them to lose at least as often as they win. Hubris is always punished--whether it's Will's mission to civilize, Jim leading a failed revolt on the campaign bus or Maggie shouting at a Sex and the City tour. Thanks again for the question and thanks a lot for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    "Genoa" is based on a real mission (I've researched it a bit). Why did you choose this mission?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Kreed, The season-long Genoa story is loosely inspired by the Tailwind story that happened at CNN in 1998. Facts have been significantly altered and none of the people involved in Tailwind have been re-created for Genoa. When I began to sketch out the second season I was looking for a legal problem that could serve as a basket to hold all our other stories and two of our consultants--Rick Kaplan and Jeff Greenfield--suggested Tailwind. Rick was the president of CNN in 1998 and Jeff was the anchor of the broadcast. They, along with two military experts, helped me update and fictionalize it. Thanks for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Creating Newsroom requires newsroom - fact checkers, writers, researchers etc. So compliments to your team who do their homework. How much time does your team take to get a story running? Do you link these stories to the characters or choose the stories that relate to the characters?

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Lanka, Thanks for the question. I worked with a great staff of writers and researchers on the second season of The Newsroom who did everything from pitching story ideas to combing through news stories from a year and a half ago. To answer your question, it's the fictional stories that come first. Real world events are the backdrop against which they're played. In last night's episode, for instance, (which was a series of interlocking sketches of public shaming), Trayvon Martin, the bombs in Syria, Tyler Clemente, etc., all stayed in the background while we watched the people who were telling those stories. Thanks again for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    "Well,I guess it's just us now."Was Will referring to his viewers,his siblings,Mackenzie?What's the meaning of this line for you?Great work!

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    That's really nice of you, thanks. Will's last line of the episode was referring to the audience, with whom he has a strained relationship. When Will and MacKenzie broke up, Will, more and more, began to rely on the invisible audience for love (which he never quite got from his father.) As MacKenzie points out to the student from Rutgers, that's a dangerous game. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Which is your favorite to write-- plays, cinema, TV shows? #HBOcollege #VCU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I'm incredibly lucky that I get to write all three. As much as I love writing movies and television shows, I'm really most comfortable doing a play. All of my education and training has been in playwriting (which is why, even when I write for the screen, it sort of feels like a radio play that a gifted director has made visually interesting.) Thanks a lot for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    I love your writing, its very smart and I know that you receive this question all time, but what or who motivates you to write like this?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks very much, that's really nice to hear. I think the answer is that I write the only way I know how to. When I try to write like someone else I get in trouble. That said, I wouldn't mind "expanding my strike zone" as they say in baseball. (In other words, get better.) Thanks again for your kind words and thanks for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    Where did it all start? What was your "aha! moment" when you decided to create #Newsroom? #HBOCollege #NCSU

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. I knew I wanted to write a workplace show in a newsroom but my problem was I didn't want to make up fake news (and obviously when you're writing scripts 6-9 months in advance of their air dates there's no way of knowing what the news is going to be.) I was sitting in the control room at MSNBC (I hung out in newsrooms, hoping I could soak something up) and was getting close to giving up on the whole idea when I looked at one of the monitors that was showing the "spill cam"--the live 24-hour feed of the oil spilling out of BP Deepwater Horizon after it sunk--and realized I could solve my problem by setting the show in the past. There were other advantages too--I could have the audience know more than the characters, which is a fun dynamic to play sometimes. I'm not sure if that qualifies as an "aha!" moment but it's the best I've got. Thanks again for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    What has become of the threat on Will's life? Lonnie?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    One of my big disappointments this season is that I couldn't get Terry Crews back. I'd mapped out a way for Lonnie to stick around for the season but by the time I was ready to pull the trigger, Terry had been cast in the new Andy Samberg series on Fox. Our loss is their gain. (I should tell you he's also the nicest guy in the world.) Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    blackmailing Reece was a huge triumph for Will and Charlie, why did you make it obsolete in this past episode? #FSU #HBOCollege

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I might be assuming the wrong thing about your hashtag but if I'm not, I'm an S.U. alum who's looking forward to playing in the ACC this year. As for your question--there are events coming down the pike that work best if Reese and Leona aren't on the hook to Charlie and Will. (You're going to see that the Lansings aren't necessarily the villains we thought they were.) Thanks for the question, go Orange and thanks for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    Being a journalist, I applaud you for making a show that promotes a return to legitimate reporting. Do you hope people follow this example?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I think many journalists already are following this example and we're trying to celebrate those that are.

  • Q

    What are the table reads like? Is the Sorkin pace always there from the beginning?

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    A
    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Table reads are a lot of fun (for everyone but me--I get nervous.) The cast got the script the night before and they've started to become familiar with it and while it's far from performance level, the actors are used to going at a certain speed. The timing on the table reads are usually within a couple of minutes of the timing on the first cut. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    How much of your inspiration (besides the news events, obviously) comes from real life experiences, and how much is pure fiction? Which character do you identify with most?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Astrid, Thanks for the question. I very rarely write autobiographically. Sometimes I can take a shard of something that's happened in my own life or a piece of conversation that I've heard and apply a "What if?" to it and build a story out of from there but if I relied on my own experiences, everything I wrote would be about someone trying to write. As for the characters, I try to identify with all of them. I like to be able to take everyone's side in an argument. Thanks again for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Are you always on the set when filming? How much directing do you do?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    We have great directors (principally Alan Poul) who does the directing--I do the hovering. Our day begins at 6AM with first rehearsal of the first scene up. The actors in the scene gather with the director and me and we read through it (we've already done a table read of the whole episode and the episode's director and I have met for many hours to discuss different aspects of production). I give notes at that point and the actors ask questions. Then the DP (Director of Photography) brings his crew in to light the scene and practice camera moves while the cast goes into hair and make-up and I go to my office (about a hundred yards from the set) to work on the next script. I'll get called to set for camera rehearsal and watch the "master"--the widest possible angle of the scene--before the director moves on to "coverage"--singles, over-the-shoulder, close-ups, etc.. Most of my time is spent writing but the day is also spotted with rehearsal/shooting, editing, casting and meetings about things I don't quite understand. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching the show.

  • Q

    Why do you think it's necessary to try and make Nina a likable character? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Maybe it's because I find Hope Davis so likable? The truth is I don't like for a character to be all one thing--especially if they're wearing a black hat. A gossip columnist who's conflicted about what they write is more interesting to me than one who's twirling their mustache (so to speak). But don't worry, she's going to let you down in Episode 6. Thanks for the question and thanks very much for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    Which character has been your favorite to write? #HBOCollege #Vandy

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I grow very attached to all the characters I'm writing. They become my entire social life. One thing I enjoy is having a character surprise the audience (and the other characters) with an action we never thought they'd take and you'll see plenty of that toward the end of the season. Thanks for the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    What characters undergo the most change this season? How so? #HBOCollege #Vandy

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. I think (hope) all the characters change but the ones that undergo the most obvious transformations are Maggie and Will. And I think Leona (Jane Fonda) and Reese (Chris Messina) are really going to surprise by the end of the season.--Aaton

  • Q

    Has writing a show like #Newsroom caused you to watch the news differently? Do you watch it less or more? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Most of the news I watch (or read) is from a year and a half ago. This show's allowed me to make some friends in the news business and develop are real respect for them. It may not always seem like it but they want badly to do well. Thanks for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    Where did you come up with the idea for Genoa? #FSU #HBOCollege

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I'm glad you asked. In 1998, CNN was launching a new Sunday night magazine show in conjunction with Time Magazine called "Newsstand". Their big lead-off story was "Tailwind", which alleged that in 1970 the U.S. Army used chemical weapons against about a hundred civilians in Laos. A few minutes after the live broadcast came down they knew there was a problem with the story and everyone from the Pentagon to CNN's media colleagues wanted heads on spikes. Two of those heads belonged to Rick Kaplan, the President of CNN at the time, and Jeff Greenfield, the anchor of the broadcast. As luck would have it, Rick and Jeff are two of our consultants this year. When I sent out word that I was looking for an idea for a lawsuit that would work as a framing device for the entire season, Rick and Jeff shot back emails saying, "Tailwind. You have to do Tailwind." I got on the next plane to New York to meet with them and I was hooked on the story. Along with Rick and Jeff, another consultant, former Navy SEAL and CNN investigative reporter Kaj Larsen as well as two former members of the Joint Chiefs (whose names I agreed not to reveal) helped me update and fictionalize the story so that ACN isn't investigating something that took place decades ago but rather just a couple of years ago and under the current president. I hope you enjoy it as it unfolds and thanks very much for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    First of all I love the show. My question is what made you decide to change the opening sequence from the way it was done in the 1st season?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Ashley--Thanks for the question. We wanted to put a fresh coat of paint on the main titles. We had the idea of telling a story. A day starts out like any other day, but suddenly there's breaking news that travels from the event to our newsroom and then to the viewer. It also meant asking Thomas Newman to write a new orchestral arrangement of his main title theme--one that was a little more urgent. I hope you like it.--Aaron

  • Q

    What are you excited for about the Newsroom?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I'm always most excited/nervous about next week's episode. I'll spend every night leading up to Sunday going through the whole episode in my head as I try to fall asleep. Every Sunday is a new opening night and while you know its not going to land with everyone, you keep your fingers crossed hard that it lands with someone. Thanks for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    Did you plot out the whole season ahead of time (with the lawsuit arc) and just fit the actual news stories and personal dramas in along the way? Or was it more along the lines of, I need Maggie to be traumatized, let's find a news story that she could have been covering? (for example)

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I drew out the general shape of the season before hand and that started coloring inside the lines. With Maggie, for example, I wanted it to be clear in the first few pages that she'd been through a dramatic event--we get the whole story in Ep. 4 ("Unintended Consequences".) But I also wanted to leave room for writers Darwinism. Guest cast will come on and knock you out and suddenly you're not ready to lose them after an episode or two so you start redesigning on the fly. I felt confident doing that because Genoa was always a solid story to hold it all together. Thanks a lot for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    If you could have Will McAvoy report on any news story from the past, what would it be and why?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I think it would be the moon landing. I just saw archival footage of the now famous moment when Cronkite is reporting that "Armstrong's on the moon." Cronkite is beaming as he takes his glasses off and wipes a tear from his eye. You get goosebumps and it reminds you how long its been since the country gathered around a news anchor for any reason other than a tragedy. Thanks for the question and I hope you like Season 2.--Aaron

  • Q

    How do you stay so informed with current affairs that you can create and write political shows without ever taking a clear side?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    All of my education, training and experience has been in playwriting and screenwriting--I'm by no means a media expert or a political sophisticate. But sometimes I like to write stories where the conflict is over ideas and in order to do that I need to surround myself with smart, interesting people who disagree with each other. In the end titles of each episode you'll a card with 12 names on it. Those are our consultants and it's worth freezing the picture and reading their names because I think they have a lot to do with what you're liking. Thanks very much for the question.--Aaron

  • Q

    can you tell us what will happen between WIll and Mac?!?!?! can we really get to see the alleged kiss?!

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    As Al Pacino says in Donnie Brasco, if I answered that, "I'd be the dumbest mutt in the mafia". I hope you enjoy finding out for yourself and thanks very much for the question.

  • Q

    Have you written for a campaign? If not, would you ever write for one?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Every once in a while I'll be asked to lend some help to the music of a speech (obviously not policy) and it's something I'm always happy to do. Thanks a lot for the question.

  • Q

    The finale discussed The Founding Fathers' stance on religion. Can we expect more coverage on the separation of church and state in America?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Thanks for the question. Church and State is a terribly important issue today and deserves someone more qualified than I am to write about it. That hasn't stopped me though, as the issue comes up, if only briefly, in Ep. 4 ("Unintended Consequences")

  • Q

    what were the news piece that will be covered in season 2?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    The season covers the time between the fall of Tripoli (about a week after the first season ended) and election night 2012. You'll see the ACN team cover OWS, Troy Davis, Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman, Benghazi and of course the campaign. Thanks fo the question and thanks for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    Who do you think has the biggest change in character this season?

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    Great question. Maggie's going to have an experience that changes her forever. Before the end credits roll on the season finale, Will's going to make a giant change and Don's going to be more at peace with who he is. Thanks for asking and thanks very much for watching.

  • Q

    What was the hardest plot-related decision for you to make regarding tonight's finale? #HBOCollege #Vandy

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    I suppose it was the decision to have Will propose. That decision was actually made around 10 months ago when I started writing Season II and believe it or not it was something we were originally going to find out in the season opener. You may remember that in the opening episode we started and ended in the conference room where Rebecca Halliday (Marcia Gay Harden) was preparing our characters for the depositions they were going to have to give in the Genoa case. In the original draft of the script we were in "present day" (the days leading up to the election) much more and the present day action included a new HR rep (played by Patton Oswalt) who was concerned about Will and Mac's romantic past. They assure him that that's all in the past but at the end of the episode we see that Mac's been hiding a ring on necklace under her shirt. As is commonly the case I changed direction but I still knew that that ring from last year was going to come out of the drawer. Thanks for the question and thanks for watching the show this year. The whole cast and crew appreciates it.--Aaron

  • Q

    What do you consider your biggest achievement in this industry? #HBOcollege

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    David--All I've ever wanted to do was to be able to earn a living as a writer and there isn't a single day that I take for granted that I'm luckiest guy in the world. I get to work with the most talented directors, actors, producers, designers and technicians in business and I'm very proud of what we've all done together (even those times when I've swung hard and missed and there have been plenty of those times.) I think the best thing, though, is being able to make a connection, however brief, with someone like you. Thanks for the question and thanks very much for watching the show.--Aaron

  • Q

    How do you decide how far ahead to skip into the future between episodes when writing for a season? #asksorkin

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    It all depends on what the next step in the story is. Sometimes an episode takes place the day after the previous episode and sometimes I jump ahead weeks or even months. I'll confess that sometimes it's hard to make those big time jumps work. With series television we're conditioned to assume that a week has gone by since the last episode (since a week has gone by since the last episode.) I'm still learning on the job. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.

  • Q

    What was the most meaningful moment of the season for you? #HBOCollege #GMU

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    That's a tough question to answer. I was very proud of the work we all did together on Ep. 205 ("News Night With Will McAvoy"--the real time episode that took place during a broadcast) and the way Jeff handled the last line of the show, "Well I guess it's just us now." More personally, it was meaningful to me every day that our team--not just the cast but the painters, carpenters, electricians, camera operators, wardrobe personnel...everyone--did their best and felt a sense of ownership of the show. Those are the people you want to be in a trench with. Thanks for the question and thanks a lot for watching.--Aaron

  • Q

    What was the point of Charlie telling Reese that Will & he were not longer offering their resignations? Would have just been easier for Charlie to keep quite when Reese gave him his decision.

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    Aaron Sorkin says:

    That was just a little friendly sparring between two people unwilling to give the other the satisfaction of owning the high road. Both were prepared to get an argument from the other and when that didn't happen they had to argue anyway. Or maybe the real answer to your question comes in Leona's line that cut them off--"You're all idiots". Thanks for the question and thanks very much for watching the show.--Aaron

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